Category: village hall cinemas

The Native Spirit Film Society

The Native Spirit Film Society

 

The Native Spirit Film Society has some exciting upcoming events that we wanted to share:
We will be screening the comedy-drama, Boy by Maori Director Taika Waititi next week. Join us for good food, a great film and as always, interesting discussions!

BOY Dir. Taika Waititi
When: Wednesday 22 February 1700-1900
Where: SOAS, London WC1H 0XG, Senate House Room G32
Watch the trailer here.
Please RSVP to Facebook event here.

Next Saturday afternoon Native Spirit UK screens Two Soft Things, Two Hard Things: a documentary about the colonization of Nunavut from the 1950s through the community’s thaw toward the LGBTQ community featuring award-winning Inuk filmmaker Alethea Arnaquq-Baril Director of Angry Inuk.

TWO SOFT THINGS, TWO HARD THINGS Dir. Mark Kenneth Woods, Michael Yerxa
& WAPIKONI MOBILE SELECTION
When: Saturday 25 February 14:00-16:30
Where: Kensington Central Library, 12 Phillimore Walk, Kensington, London W8 7RX (Entrance rear of Library)
Watch the trailer here.
Please RSVP to the event here or phone 020 7361 3010 Kensington Central Library direct (extra places available).
Enquiries: nativespiritfilms@gmail.com

GREEN FORTNIGHT

SOAS Green Society will be hosting a very exciting fortnight of events in due time! More information will be released on their Facebook page and through the SU email, but they have kindly asked us to hold a screening during this time. We will be showing the film ‘The Cherokee Word For Water’, a true story about the first modern female Chief of the Cherokee Nation and her fight to bring clean water into her community.

When: Tuesday 7 March 1900-2100
Where: SOAS Brunei Building, Room B111
Watch the trailer here.

All events free – public donations towards Native Spirit Festival organising costs welcome

Sony VPL-VW665ES 4K 3D Projector Review



Sony VPL-VW665ES 4K 3D Projector Review

2

The Sony VPL-VW665ES delivers super sharp images in native 4K resolution (8.8 million pixels – 4096 x 2160). For some context, this is the same resolution which is defined by Digital Cinema Initiatives for cinema distribution. Yes, this projectors resolution is really that good. Further, the projector features advanced SXRD panels with a lightning fast response rate of just two and a half milliseconds, this greatly minimises the space between pixels for a notably smoother and more detailed picture.

The VPL-VW665ES is packing a1800 lumen, 280V lamp which delivers unrivalled brightness and lasts a pretty long time. How long? We’re talking 6000 hours of use time (in low light mode). The projector has a dynamic contrast ratio of 300,000:1 which will delight anyone who appreciates detail-packed images in vibrant colour with deep rich blacks. Further, the projector features proprietary Motion Flow technology which renders fast moving action shots super smoothly. But the projector has even more up its sleeve. The VPL-VW665ES has a built in sophisticated 4K up-scaler, so all of those standard resolution DVD’s and Blu-Rays will be given a new lease of life. Oh and did we mention that the projector is also fully HDR compatible?

This Sony projector does however come with an environmental notice due to the lamp’s mercury component so disposal must follow environmental guidelines in your locality. Other little disappointments include lack of support for DCI-P3 colour gamut and some vertical stretches. But we feel that these small negatives only slightly detract from the other impressive features of the VPL-VW665ES.

Cheshire East grant helps community cinema become a reel success – Crewe Chronicle



Cheshire East grant helps community cinema become a reel success – Crewe Chronicle.

Cheshire East grant helps community cinema become a reel success



Cheshire East grant helps community cinema become a reel success

Chair of Holmes Chapel Parish Council Councillor Steve Ranger with Cheshire East Councillor Les Gilbert presenting Bill Bowers, treasurer of Holmes Chapel Community Cinema, with of over £1000.
Cheshire East Council has given a community cinema group more than £1,000 to help get it off the ground.

Holmes Chapel Community Cinema, known as HC3 for short, has held its first screening and Cheshire East Councillor Les Gilbert was on hand to present a cheque for £1,115 from the council’s community grant scheme to support the new venture.

Cllr Gilbert said: “This is a great example of a community-led project and projects such as this illustrate the strong sense of community that exists in Holmes Chapel.

HC3 secretary Judith Nichols at the ticket desk.
“I want to congratulate HC3 chair Peter Clinton, its treasurer Bill Bowers and the rest of the team.

“I know that a lot of effort has gone in to this and I was very pleased to see such a strong turnout to see their first screening.

“Cheshire East Council is pleased to be able to support the project by funding the start-up costs.

“I now urge the community to get behind this initiative and show their ongoing support – and I wish the project every success going forward.”

Holmes Chapel Parish Council chairman Steve Ranger added: “This was a fantastic night for the village – the fruit of some brilliant work by the team, who set this up in a short time.

“The project was triggered by the results from a parish council survey to find out what things the people of Holmes Chapel wanted in terms of facilities, and the show of interest for a community cinema was very strong, with over 200 households saying that it was one of the things they wanted.

“We are very grateful to Cheshire East Council for providing a contribution of over £1,000 to help with the start-up costs.”

Holmes Chapel Community Cinema treasurer Bill Bowers said: “The community cinema is being run on a non-profit basis. The aim is to make the cinema self-sustaining but it needed a bit of financial support to get it going.

“We have set up a website www.hc3.uk where we will advertise upcoming screenings and we plan to use some of the grant money to put up a notice board at the library.

“I’d like to say how delighted I was to see everyone attend the showing of Belle. It was wonderful to see the place full.”

Holmes Chapel residents



Holmes Chapel residents

Community cinema just the ticket for Holmes Chapel residents

For more information, visit hc3.uk.

A COMMUNITY cinema proved a reel success when it made its debut in Holmes Chapel last month.

Holmes Chapel Community Cinema (HC3) held its first screening, period drama Belle, at the Victoria Club on September 18.
Organisers breathed a sigh of relief as the event, which was the result of months of hard work, proved a huge hit with residents.

Bill Bowers, HC3 treasurer, said: “I’d like to say how delighted I was to see everyone attend the showing of Belle. We were all biting our nails, wondering how many people would come – and it was wonderful to see the place full.”

The HC3 project was triggered by the results of a parish council survey ‘What We Want for Holmes Chapel’, which indicated desire for a community cinema.

The parish council asked a group of volunteers to set this up on a non-profit basis and a start-up grant of £1,115 has been provided by Cheshire East Council.

Cheshire East Clr Les Gilbert, who attended the last month’s screening on behalf of the council, said: “This is a great example of a community-led project and projects such as this illustrate the strong sense of community that exists in Holmes Chapel.

“Something like this doesn’t just happen by itself – it takes people with vision and energy to make it happen.

Halkyn Village Hall

Halkyn Village Hall

A community cinema could be on the cards for Halkyn as residents host a meeting on proposals to bring a big screen to the area.

There are more than 600 community cinemas across the UK set up in towns and villages where the nearest commercial cinema is located well over 10 miles away.

As well as offering the opportunity to watch a range of films, documentaries and animations in a cinema setting, they also provide opportunities to discuss and debate films and create connections between people who might otherwise be isolated.

A meeting will be held tonight (Thursday) at Halkyn Village Hall to explore the idea of starting up a cinema and whether or not it is something that the people of Halkyn Mountain want.

If there is support for the plans, a committee or working group will be formed to move the project forward to seek funding and identify suitable venues for the screenings.

Clare Madders is one of the people behind the idea.

She says that the project is still in the very early stages but that they are hoping to be able to move it forward in coming weeks.

She said: “A community cinema is a volunteer-led and non-profit organisation that shows films in its community.

“These cinemas can show a whole range of films, including blockbusters and new releases as well as classics, documentaries and animations.”

The meeting is due to take place at the village hall at 7pm.

Clare added: “We are also looking for people to be part of the working group to try and take this idea forward so please do let us know if you would be interested in helping in this way.”

For information, email mountaincinema@yahoo.co.uk or visit www.halkyn.org .

National Conference for Community Cinemas + Film… Tickets, Sheffield – Eventbrite

National Conference for Community Cinemas + Film… Tickets, Sheffield – Eventbrite.

National Conference for Community Cinemas + Film Society of the Year Awards

Cinema For All

Saturday, September 27, 2014 at 9:00 AM – Sunday, September 28, 2014 at 5:00 PM (BST)

Sheffield, United Kingdom

 

Film lovers in Nottingham had choice of 50 cinemas during screen industry heyday

Film lovers in Nottingham had choice of 50 cinemas during screen industry heyday

Read more: http://www.nottinghampost.com/Film-lovers-choice-50-cinemas-screen-industry/story-21293175-detail/story.html#ixzz35t8vgMgu
Read more at http://www.nottinghampost.com/Film-lovers-choice-50-cinemas-screen-industry/story-21293175-detail/story.html#uIv7kYz48Yf7mwZd.99

Until that time, old cinemas had closed for one of two reasons. Either they needed rebuilding to accommodate growing audiences or they were blocking redevelopment projects.

In 1927, the New Empress was flattened to make way for the new market that would accommodate produce traders displaced from the planned Old Market Square.

No fewer than 49 cinemas were built in Nottingham between 1908 and 1939. If you looked at the entertainment section of the Post in the early 1950s you would have found a choice of 47 cinemas in the city and nearby area alone.

Old friends like Roxy, Metropole, Gaumont, Cavendish, Empress Orion, Rio and other exotically named cinemas were still going strong. Virtually every district could boast one or more art deco palaces with their wonderful interiors like the Futurist at Basford, the Adelphi at Bulwell and the Cavendish in St Ann’s.

Some like the Odeon and the Carlton were owned by the big circuits. But many were in private ownership and they paid their way. The last performance each evening would invariably play to a full house.

Long queues snaked along city streets on Saturday afternoon and evening for the big city cinemas like the Odeon and Elite.

Read more: http://www.nottinghampost.com/Film-lovers-choice-50-cinemas-screen-industry/story-21293175-detail/story.html#ixzz35t96WURx
Read more at http://www.nottinghampost.com/Film-lovers-choice-50-cinemas-screen-industry/story-21293175-detail/story.html#uIv7kYz48Yf7mwZd.99

Old wound reopened’ as baths up for sale

Old wound reopened’ as baths up for sale

http://www.rossendalefreepress.co.uk/news/local-news/old-wound-reopened-baths-up-7335131

Residents say they are unhappy about the lack of consultation over the sale of the former Haslingden Baths site, which was closed in November in the face of strong public opposition.

LISTED CINEMAS AT RISK



This building type is highly relevant to Britain’s architectural and social heritage of the first half of the Twentieth Century, when picture palaces were a cornerstone of everyday life, entertainment and social interchange. While the façades were sometimes kept modest, exciting worlds of fantasy and escapism were offered on the insides with the exotic and highly stylized interior decorative schemes transporting the customers into a different world. Since then, these once ubiquitous fixtures have started to disappear from our towns and cities and virtually intact examples are becoming increasingly rare.

LISTED CINEMAS AT RISK

http://cinema-theatre.org.uk/our-campaigns/cinemas-at-risk/